Monday, August 1, 2016

Oregon: Jury awards$3 million to fired nurse who complained of 'rushing patients through' to save money

http://www.oregonlive.com/portland/index.ssf/2015/09/jury_awards_3_million_to_legac.html


By Aimee Green

A Portland jury on Friday awared a nurse more than $3 million -- agreeing that she was wrongfully terminated by Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center after she complained to management that cost cutting measures were jeopardizing patient care. Registered nurse Linda Boly said Saturday that she felt vindicated by the verdict. She hopes it sends a "big message" to Legacy
Health System that "rushing patients through" the process endangers them. . . .

To read the rest of the article, click here.

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Lawsuit alleges Kaiser anesthesiologists told to skimp on anesthesia, rush patients through, save money

http://www.oregonlive.com/portland/index.ssf/2016/07/lawsuit_kaiser_anesthesiologis.html

A former Kaiser Permanente anesthesiologist has filed a $9 million lawsuit against the health organization, claiming he was fired after he repeatedly complained that cost-cutting measures were jeopardizing the safety of patients in the Portland area.

Among those measures was an August 2014 mandate from higher-ups that anesthesiologists reduce the amount of knock-out or anti-anxiety meds they give surgery patients so the patients would wake up sooner and be discharged as soon as possible, according to a lawsuit filed by Dr. Erik Franck last week in Multnomah County Circuit Court.

Thursday, October 9, 2014

Media Advisory: Disability Groups Respond to Compassion and Choices’ Advocacy for Assisted Suicide Legislation in Connection With Brittany Maynard’s Tragic Illness

http://www.notdeadyet.org/2014/10/media-advisory-disability-groups-respond-to-compassion-and-choices-advocacy-for-assisted-suicide-legislation-in-connection-with-brittany-maynards-tragic-illness.html



[Editor's Note: A PDF formatted version of this Media Advisory is available on PRWeb here, along with an attached flyer developed by a coalition of groups that oppose legalization of assisted suicide.]
Response from Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund, Not Dead Yet and Second Thoughts:
“Once again, Compassion & Choices, formerly the Hemlock Society, is pushing legalization of assisted suicide by exploiting an individual terminal prognosis. Disability advocates are deeply sympathetic to Brittany Maynard, and all people suffering a terminal, serious or chronic illness. Legalization of assisted suicide often looks acceptable when the focus is solely on an individual.

Saturday, December 3, 2011

Helium Hood Seller Pleads Guilty to Tax Fraud

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-suicide-lady-20111203,0,3503245.story

San Diego-area suicide kit seller agrees to stop sale of devices

El Cajon woman came under scrutiny when one of her products was found on a dead 29-year-old in Oregon.

Reporting from San Diego -- A former schoolteacher who sold suicide kits that she once touted as leaving people "eternally sleepy" pleaded guilty Friday to a tax evasion charge and agreed to stop encouraging people to commit suicide.

Sharlotte Hydorn mailed more than 1,300 of the so-called helium hood suicide kits to people around the world, concealing the true nature of the product by describing the boxes as "orchid humidifiers" or "beauty bonnets" or "plastic rain hoods" on U.S. customs forms, according to federal prosecutors.

The $60 kits actually contained a clear plastic bag, medical grade tubing and a how-to diagram. A customer would place the bag over his head, connect the tubing from the bag to a helium tank and turn the valve. Death would be caused by helium asphyxiation.

Hydorn, 91, who was once an elementary school science teacher, marketed the product to terminally ill people as a compassionate alternative. She admitted to federal agents, however, that she didn't verify the physical condition, age or identity of the people who ordered her product.

She drew scrutiny last year after one of her devices was found over the head of a dead 29-year-old man from Eugene, Ore. In May, federal agents raided her home in El Cajon, east of San Diego, where she assembled the kits with her son.

Investigators determined that the kits had been sold to at least 50 people in San Diego County since 2007. In 2010, four San Diego residents — none of them terminally ill — committed suicide using the kits, according to prosecutors.

Hydorn said she became interested in assisted suicide after watching her once-healthy husband die after a long battle with colon cancer
30 years ago. He died in a hospital bed, and she regrets not being able to respect his wishes to die in the comfort of his home.

Her product, Hydorn said, ends lives peacefully, leaving people "eternally sleepy."

In Oregon, where assisted suicide is legal under certain conditions, lawmakers have introduced a bill that would outlaw any device sold with the intent that another person use it to commit suicide.

Hydorn had failed to file federal income tax returns since 2007 and agreed to pay about $26,000 in outstanding taxes, prosecutors said. She faces a maximum penalty of one year in prison and is scheduled to be sentenced Feb. 26.

richard.marosi@latimes.com